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Rutty

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  1. Rutty

    Doubling up comp cards

    There are slight differences that will be apparent to an experienced scorer. For airguns, he target that was underneath will usually have a slightly larger shot hole. This will be apparent when the target is compared with other targets that have been shot in the correct manner, it is not essential to have the top target to compare. Under these circumstances it is not necessary to conclusively prove that cheating took place, the scorer may disallow the card(s) under Rule 7.4.5. It is then up to the shooter to contest the decision; it will come as no surprise that few choose to do so. Rutty
  2. Rutty

    Doubling up comp cards

    It is against the rules and any target that was presented to me as a scorer and I suspected had been shot behind another target would be disqualified. The matter would be reported to the league organisers and the NSRA for further investigation. Rutty
  3. Rutty

    Doubling up comp cards

    sg1, At post #7 of this thread you referred to not having any "evidence" of wrongdoing. You may find the following extract from the NSRA Rules helpful (I have added emphasis where appropriate): Rutty
  4. Rutty

    Doubling up comp cards

    You have missed the point, it does not matter which card is in front and which is behind, they are claiming to have shot both in accordance with the rules. They will have used half the aimed shots to count for twice the score! It is against the NSRA Rules: "7.4.2 A shooter may have more than one match card and a sighting or practice card facing him on the butts at the same time. and 8.15.3.4 No shooter is allowed to have more than one card at any one butt at any one time." The status and duties of the witness are to be found in the NSRA Rules Section 7.5-7.6. The rules may be downloaded from the Reference section of the NSRA Website. If you do not wish to download and study them, then at least read the Foreword which is reproduced verbatim below: Rutty
  5. Rutty

    Doubling up comp cards

    They have entered a competition and they are not abiding by the rules. They have only shot once, but are claiming that they shot twice, or more. If it was allowed we could put all the stickers for the whole league on one card and settle it all on Round 1 and not bother with the hassle of shooting the other 9 rounds. If a league is of 10 rounds of 20 shots, total 200, then that is what you are required to fire, not some lesser number. The most serious aspect of the affair is not the action itself but the failure to comply with the witnessing rules. The witness signs that they have seen the cards shot and are satisfied that the rules were observed. If what is described has occurred then this is clearly not the case. The witnesses are either negligent or complicit. Postal competitions rely on trust. If you cannot trust all competitors to abide by the rules then the whole system becomes unworkable. The argument that those who cheat are only cheating themselves is fallacious, they deny the enjoyment of open competition to everyone else. Rutty
  6. Rutty

    Doubling up comp cards

    You don't need evidence to report what you have heard. It is up to the league organisers to investigate in order to ascertain whether or not there is any substance to the reports. Rutty
  7. Rutty

    Doubling up comp cards

    I would certainly report it. The whole system of "postal" shooting relies on the integrity of the participants. For those that might argue this is an "honest mistake" by the perpetrators I would counter that on entering any competition; especially one that relies to a high degree on trust; it is your duty to scrupulously observe the rules. That in turn requires that you ensure you are thoroughly conversant with them and if what you describe is happening then this is clearly not the case. However if this is an "honest mistake" then you could consider bringing it to the attention of the culprits and suggest they voluntarily withdraw from any competitions where they have employed this practice. You would have to make it plain though, that should they not comply you would have no hesitation in reporting them. Finally, if you have knowledge of a serious infringement and fail to bring it to the attention of the appropriate body then you are in effect complicit yourself. Square up and do the right thing. Rutty
  8. Rutty

    Doubling up comp cards

    Quite simply, no. The only exception under NSRA Rules is the section dealing with damaged or mutilated targets: The specific rules pertaining to some competitions may allow "concurrent" shooting, i.e. the stickers for two competitions may be affixed to one card. But this usually only applies when a team and individual competition is being shot under the auspices of the same organiser. When a card has been shot behind another it is quite easy to spot, even without the front card to compare. The practice would constitute discreditable conduct and would probably result in a ban for not only the shooter and witness but also any club officials who had condoned the practice. Rutty
  9. Rutty

    Sussex L.S.R Div 11 , 1st place (Summer)

    It's a lot better than being 2nd anywhere! (i.e. first loser!) That's right Well done and good shooting for the winter. Rutty
  10. Rutty

    10m Target Rifle for my 10yr old son

    Air Arms 200 Mk1 or 2 is the best option. There are other secondhand possibilities such as the FWB 300 Junior, but these are as rare as hen's teeth. Another candidate would be the Walther LG300 XT Junior Air Rifle, but this costs nearly £1200. The FWB 700 Junior or the FWB 500 would also be suitable, but at a price. Rutty
  11. Rutty

    Looking for advice for disabled child

    No problem, the NSRA policy is one of providing a level playing field for all participants regardless of any disability. The procedure is quite straightforward: From the NSRA Rules: A club instructor or coach would be able to advise and help with this. Now by the sound of it your son would be fall into the SH2 class under ISCD Rules: 12.3.3 Specifications class SH 2: Rifle competitors who have measurable and /or visible permanent disability in upper limbs and therefore are unable to support the weight of a rifle for the purpose of the competitions with their upper limbs and require a shooting stand. The stand referred to has a spring that allows movement but a the same time supports the weight of the rifle. Now the issue with air pistol is that there is no SH2 category as it is judged that it is too difficult to establish whether at support stand might constitute unfair advantage. Find a club with knowledge of disabled shooting and take it from there. He's probably left it a bit late for the 2012 Paralympics and might still be a bit too young on 2016. But in 2020 he will still only be 19 and have had 9 years to prepare - go for it! Rutty
  12. Rutty

    Looking for advice for disabled child

    Shootersdad, You would be much better off with starting him on rifle which he would be able to shoot from a spring stand. As for a club, contact the National Smallbore Rifle Association who should be able to put you in touch with a club that has good wheelchair access. Pistol is not impossible with low arm strength but the "fixes" are more difficult. Rutty
  13. Rutty

    The Edge 10 Metre Target Rifle

    The S400 MPR is fine, but there are better secondhand rifles available for a similar price to a new S400 MPR. The MPR is the cheapest PCP in this class on the market, but a FWB601/2/3, although a SSP, is a much better rifle. To put it another way, FWB SSPs featured in the finals of the Olympics and World Championships, you are never going to see an S400 at that level. Rutty
  14. Rutty

    The Edge 10 Metre Target Rifle

    First of all try to use as many different rifles as possible. Talk to people at your club and ask if you can try theirs. Whilst those rifles will be set up for their owners it will give you an idea because what the rifle feels like is very important. In short you have to like shooting it. What it looks like is unimportant, except as an indicator of how well it has been looked after. The list of what you might find suitable is quite extensive: FWB 300 or 300S - £200-300 A bit long in the tooth but an excellent starting point Walther LGR - About the same age as the FWB 300, a single stoke pneumatic (SSP), a little harder to find FWB 601/602/603 The FWB SSP series - you should find a good specimen for £350-400. Avoid the FWB600. Anschutz 2000 - SSP, the first successful air rifle from Anschutz FWB P70 - Pre Charged Pneumatic (PCP)- excellent rifle, if you see one in your price range snap it up. Wood and Aluminum stock versions available Anschutz 2002 - PCP similar age and quality to the P70 The only new rifle in your price range is the Air Arms MPR and it isn't really in the same league as those above. What I would not recommend is the Anschutz 250 or Original 75. Whilst OK, both of these older rifles have shortcomings, you can do better. The list above is not exhaustive and others may add to it or have differing views. Hope that this helps. Rutty
  15. Rutty

    The Edge 10 Metre Target Rifle

    Yes, I have shot the Edge and whilst the build standard is fairly good, the design still has serious shortcomings. It is clearly aimed at the CMP/Sporter market sponsored by the NRA of America. As such it is an adequate product that is going to appeal to its target market, juniors taking up the sport. However it still has serious shortcomings as a competitive 10mtr rifle. The sightline displacement is a major problem, it is around the upper limit under ISSF rules, so if you need a more erect head position you cannot achieve it on the Edge as you will be unable to add much additional height. The trigger can be improved upon but it will never equal the Anschutz/FWB/Walther trigger and will be hard pushed to equal an Air Arms trigger that has a small amount of work done on it. Whilst you can add weight to it, the basic rifle is still far too light, unless you are a small junior shooter. The amount of weight that would have to be added to make it suitbale for a normal size adult would present a major configuration challenge. It is not "recoilless" but the recoil is low because it is a PCP, there is no recoil reducer or compensator in the design. However, the light weight will cause the movement imparted by shot release to be increased due to both mass and inertial issues. In short if you are looking for a club rifle for small juniors it is OK (although I would still go for an Air Arms S200 in preference) but if you are thinking in terms of an adult 10mtr rifle then there are many better options available. Rutty
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