Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Swedrik

Keeping track of your progress

How keep track of your shooting  

11 members have voted

  1. 1. Do you keep a steady log of your shooting?

    • Yes
      7
    • No
      4
  2. 2. What do you log?

    • What worked
      2
    • What what didn't work
      2
    • Scores
      7
    • Group sizes
      5
    • Individual shot's position
      0
    • Timing
      0
    • Physical conditions
      1
    • Mental condition (stress, concentration etc)
      0
    • Gun and sights settings
      2
    • Ammunition details
      6
    • Equiment used (gun, shoes, clothing etc)
      4
    • Preparations
      1
    • External factors (weather, noise etc)
      4
    • Other important stuff that Swedrik didn't think of
      1
  3. 3. Which of the above parameters do you find most important?

    • What worked
      2
    • What what didn't work
      0
    • Scores
      3
    • Group sizes
      3
    • Individual shot's position
      0
    • Timing
      0
    • Physical conditions
      0
    • Mental condition (stress, concentration etc)
      0
    • Gun and sights settings
      0
    • Ammunition details
      1
    • Equiment used (gun, shoes, clothing etc)
      0
    • Preparations
      0
    • External factors (weather, noise etc)
      0
    • Other important stuff that Swedrik didn't think of
      2


Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

As someone who just took up 10 m rifle shooting again, and added 10 m air pistol to that, I miss a good way to keep track of my shooting and analyze my results. How do you, both beginners and pros, keep a log of your shooting? I imagine you could settle anywhere from general remarks to documenting every shot in detail. What would you say is the right balance? Are there different needs for rifle and pistol shooting? And what parts of your log do you find most relevant and helpful? Lots of questions, I hope they may be interesting.

 

Best regards,

Swedrik

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I shoot LSR(Light Sporting Rifle) competiton @20 yards mainly , I started out with Air but have switched over to Rimfire as I find it easier with consistency of ammunition and to be honest a box of 50 .22LR cost about the same as a top quality airgun ammo anyway , But I do use air on the Sussex comps and .22 live on Hampshire cards :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi,

 

As someone who just took up 10 m rifle shooting again, and added 10 m air pistol to that, I miss a good way to keep track of my shooting and analyze my results. How do you, both beginners and pros, keep a log of your shooting? I imagine you could settle anywhere from general remarks to documenting every shot in detail. What would you say is the right balance? Are there different needs for rifle and pistol shooting? And what parts of your log do you find most relevant and helpful? Lots of questions, I hope they may be interesting.

 

Best regards,

Swedrik

 

Hmm... i tend to prefer advising what you did, for how long, what you worked on, how it felt and went and any other thoughts. Score chasing can be detrimental I think, stops you thinking about what makes up a good score, and I think you should be thinking about what you're doing rather than what you want.

 

Analyse the shot, not the result :) Consistent results come from consistent shooting, good consistent results come from good consistent shooting.

 

I think logs are useful in getting a shooter to recognise things... but if there's too much information, you lose the point. If i'm working with someone, I tend to only work on one aspect, and leave that to be worked on for say a week. That's when a log is quite useful, as an aid to feedback from the shooter and their memory.

 

It's also useful as an aid to get a shooter to recognise where their time is being spent, and how fruitful what they are doing is. I worked with someone on their shooting and simply got them to log the time they spent shooting, or doing something shooting related (like maintaining their kit, or traveling). It was quite eye opening to him just how much time he was spending, and what he was doing with it. Better time management has allowed him to be more efficient with his time by removing elements that were, at best, unproductive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rob, your advice makes good sense. Being a guy who likes graphs and plots, I wonder if you would you go as far as to say that you shouldn't record scores in your training at all? Over time, the manifestation of your progress is, as you say, consistent results but it is also tighter groups, closer to the center of the target. Since I do my shooting in the garage and do not see myself competing in any foreseeable future, I feel the need not only for points to focus on, but also for a few measurable parameters to keep track of. I imagine that would help me see the results of adjustments to my technique and also get the satisfaction of seeing improving "hard facts". Am I on the right track or is it a case of a newbie getting hypnotized by the numbers?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

group size and shape is a good thing to look over... see if there's any common ground, and see if you can get to the bottom of those that spoil it :)

 

(sorry lost the thread for a while)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tend to keep a small log for my Airpistol shooting. Mainly, it states: how it went, score, things I tried/changed, problems I encountered and maybe solved. Groupsize is more important than score. And problems and solving them are very important too. You dó need a degree of self diagnostics for that though..You need to séé yr doing something wrong. Having a coach can help a lot there. Or being 1 yrself, like I am..;)

Rare external conditions can be mentioned as well. (extreme heat, illness..).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I shoot LSR(Light Sporting Rifle) competiton @20 yards mainly , I started out with Air but have switched over to Rimfire as I find it easier with consistency of ammunition and to be honest a box of 50 .22LR cost about the same as a top quality airgun ammo anyway , But I do use air on the Sussex comps and .22 live on Hampshire cards :)

Gosh you must buy some expensive air gun pellets or very cheap Rimfire ammo. :eek:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well maybe a 'slight' exaggeration :) (I've had an expensive month with gun cabinets,ammo safes, partners FAC application and my SGC application so money has just gone scrambled in my head LOL )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gosh you must buy some expensive air gun pellets or very cheap Rimfire ammo. :eek:

 

Not really. Say a good tin of .177 is about £7-8 or certainly in that region... .22 match stuff... around the same.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some to add to the above.

 

How you felt. Your emotions when shooting can be something to track. Expand it to how you felt about aspects and changes.

 

Also, what time you shot. Also what you ate, and when, perhaps up to 24-36 hours before.

 

Having a shooting log is a very good start. If you are looking to improve performance, it's a fundamental really. There is some debate and resistance to it by some shooters, but I personally can't see any negatives to just actually taking the first steps and doing it. A coach will be able to help with what they feel is important for you to record and review.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes eat your main meal at least 3-4 hours before shooting.

 

If you shoot LSR find a batch that goes well and buy in bulk -- I last bought 20,000 of my last batch which was really good suited me and my rifle.

 

Keep your scores in a small book and transfer them to computer, you can make a graph of your progress.

 

You can buy a small windmeter (cheap) as used by aeromodellers and check the sidewind if shooting outside and correct for that

Good luck

JJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats personal I think, I'm used to eating small things every 3 hours or so. After that, I get hungry again. If I ignore that, I start shivering, get lightheaded a bit..etc Do what is good for yóu. Allthough a fullsize meal probably isnt good right before shooting. Shooting on an empty stomach isnt good either.;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×