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Air Arms

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Must have been a very delicate motorcycle, I used to use a blow torch.

 

Good idea though.

 

I already use a piece of leather to get more grip, that and the wooden jaws of a workmate.

No, but often I wanted the oil seals to remain intact - those bits cost too much to just bubble away with the blow torch :lol2: Used to use the blow torch for fork/gearbox bushes & bearings though :cheers:

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Must have been a very delicate motorcycle, I used to use a blow torch.

 

Good idea though.

 

I already use a piece of leather to get more grip, that and the wooden jaws of a workmate.

 

No, but often I wanted the oil seals to remain intact - those bits cost too much to just bubble away with the blow torch :lol2: Used to use the blow torch for fork/gearbox bushes & bearings though :cheers:

I'm so glad I never got into bikes... :)

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Holly, when putting new main bearings in Triumph engine, an oven is the best way to get the casings to expand enough.... just keep all the windows open.

 

Rich, when I used to work on Pro-T's and EV's, I only ever did the reg or air tube up hand tight. I couldn't tighten them any more, as I only used my hands :-)

Oven for the casing & the fridge for the bearing, again, open windows & don't let the mrs know :awink:

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That's it.

 

I used to restore old British bikes, so the blow torch was often my best friend, that, a block of wood and a large hammer.

 

Plus a gnarly stud extractor and a set of Imperial helicoils.

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Mind you, sometimes opening the windows didn't help - the stench of hot Hypoy gets everywhere :poster_oops:

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Must have had the last two British bikes in 77 and 79 Made in Brum with Sachs engines.

Hated gearboxes above split horizontally.

Just a big hammer and drift to suit the collar works every time. Cant say that for Gen 2 bearings 10 yr ago.

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It sounds as if you guys spent more time finding creative ways to disassemble the bikes you had instead of actually riding them? :)

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Not necessarily. I used to build / restore engines and gearboxes for other people.

 

At the same time I used to have a couple of rolling restorations of my own on the go.

 

I ended up building a Triumph 750 flat tracker custom from (some) 1950's Thunderbird bits (yes I know there was no 750 back then, I built the engine from old and new parts). It was featured in AWOL magazine and later I used to hillclimb / sprint it. I swapped it in the end for a big pile of T140V bits, that I still have (still in bits).

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Neil the bit's ??? HOLLY

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They would always be breaking down if they did Rich.

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Pardon me, do Air Arms make bikes??

Judging by the way they screw the bits together I.e. So it needs a factory visit to get them apart, they think they're building armoured vehicles... :)

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They seem to have a reasonably good product . let down by poor staff at the factory . possibly they could do the same as daystate and farm it out to a pro . like dave at SCR ??? HOLLY

 

PS or in this case Neil .

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Given that the factory has easy access to a group of shooter who between them boast something like ten World FT Championship wins, you'd think they would ask some or all of them what they look for in a rifle.

 

I know Jenks was involved in the stock of the FTP, but did they speak to any of the AA team(s) shooters during design and prototyping?

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Prototypes were handed out to a select few Nick was one.

 

Daystate asked me in 2007 what was needed, told them but still went their way not what the punters wanted, it could have been so good.

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Air Arms did much the same with the EV2.

 

They asked Nick about a new design, sent him early prototypes and completely ignored everything he told them. This is the reason why he has never been a fan of the EV.

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Aren't they just priceless, sounds like it's more to do with bean counting than producing a World class rifle.

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EV2 a better rifle that's outdated 15 years whereas FTP outdated 25 years ago in a backward move.

No R&D

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EV2 a better rifle that's outdated 15 years whereas FTP outdated 25 years ago in a backward move.

No R&D

Well, I'm an old git, so the face fits regarding the FTP... :)

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I'm not sure anyone is really moving things forward are they Jon?

 

Daystate's solenoid trigger is now more than ten years old, barrels seem, on and off, to be improving, but what's REALLY new?

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I'm not sure anyone is really moving things forward are they Jon?

 

Daystate's solenoid trigger is now more than ten years old, barrels seem, on and off, to be improving, but what's REALLY new?

The electronics on the Pulsar are all brand new arent they? I guess solenoid hammer system is the same though.

 

The biggest step forward or at least something new and innovative Ive seen recently is the hammerless system by Huben Airguns... http://www.hubenairguns.com/about.html

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SteveC200, my antivirus found a threat in your link.

Quite right too considering they're behind the great firewall of China.... :)

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A couple of Daystate ideas in the past few years have been innovatory. The way the second generation Airwolfs work, by having a transducer monitoring the reservoir pressure, and feeding that info to a look-up table that outputs to the "hammer" the right amount of clout to give the valve, to keep a flat power curve. This effectively does much of what a regulator does, and with no moving parts. And with the right kit, instantly programmable for a change in input parameters. Imagine that software being held on an SD card that you could take out and write new data to.

 

Their other idea of the built-in chrono at the muzzle might not have been perfected, and it was perhaps hard to see how that would work in unison with the above system, but that too was revolutionary, didn't need daylight etc.

 

Finally, now that the HO has clarified the situation regarding sub 12fpe semi autos, I can see that taking off, with new disciplines and new competitions coming in. Turning targets, for example, which are great fun but darned near impossible to do with magazine rifles, and out of the question with single shot. Every FT comp could have a proper speed shoot.

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SteveC200, my antivirus found a threat in your link.

Hmm, odd, mine doesnt show anything iffy.

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Heres the Huben blurb, copy and paste (sorry about the weird red and black, thats how it is on the site)...

 

 

HUBEN is an emerging brand in the global airgun industry. It is dedicated to R & D, manufacturing and sales of high-precision and long-range airguns. After years of effort, it has successfully developed a new structure - hammerless semiautomatic excitation mechanism for PCP airguns, and applied for patents for it in many countries. The working principle of the hammerless mechanism is as follows: after the trigger is pulled to release the sear, air pressure pushes the piston backward. Driven by the piston, the air valve opens the air passage and the pellet is propelled out. Then the air passage is cut off by an adjustable shut-off valve. After that, the air pressure pushing the piston backward disappears, and the piston returns to its original position under the force of the spring, thus achieving automatic hooking.

The mechanism boasts the following features:
1:High pressure valve opening. Theoretically, increasing the air pressure makes opening the valve easier.
2:The air passage diameter can be very large (even larger than the barrel diameter). Therefore, the airflow resistance is extremely low. Because of these two features, the kinetic energy is maximized.
3:The piston stroke is short and the piston itself is light weighted. Therefore, the valve opening speed is very high in a very short period of time and the vibration is small, significantly enhancing the shooting accuracy.
4:The shut-off valve is at the core of this technology. It can shut off the air passage according to the airflow speed. The wider the shut-off valve opens, the faster the airflow speed for cutting off the air passage will be, or vice versa. As a result, the muzzle velocity can be adjusted steplessly and easily in a wide range by adjusting the opening of the shut-off valve. You can adjust the projectile to any muzzle velocity you want. The air passage is cut off before the projectile leaves the barrel, thus preventing air waste. The muzzle velocity fluctuation is very small, generally less than 3 meters per second.

In addition, to enhance the gas storage pressure of PCP airguns and increase the number of firings, HUNBEN has also developed a manual pressure pump working under a pressure of 35 MPa and a constant pressure valve that adjusts the pressure.

With all these features, HUBEN products are bound to bring you unprecedented using experiences. As it goes global in 2015, HUBEN will continue to cater for your needs!

Edited by SteveC200

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