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Rabbit over an open fire


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#1 John Hayward

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 03:14 PM

All,

I run a small survival company and am about to run my first proper course. I am quite content to eat rabbit cooked over an open fire but it does get rather chewy. Does anyone have any tips for the initial preparation (in a forest, at night) to soften it up or simply make it nicer and more palettable?

many thanks,

NC

#2 big paul

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 04:12 PM

I used to ber in a reenactment group and we used to cut the skin with a knife then rub some honey into these cuts and also a little bit over the skin before cooking, still a bit tough but tastes a whole lot less of the fire.

#3 John Hayward

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 04:33 PM

oooh.. I like that idea. There are a great many apples that I could slice up and do something similar with. Top Tip!! Thanks.

#4 Brian Again

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 11:46 AM

I cooked rabbit over a fire once, the meat was the colour and consistency of a leather rifle sling. There just isn't enough fat, so unless you can wrap it in streaky bacon I'd suggect a Dutch Oven is your best bet.

#5 kyska

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 02:46 PM

Or raw, just shake the fleas off and tuck in.

#6 daveuk

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Posted 23 November 2009 - 10:16 PM

I would suggest a simple stew rather than cooking the flesh over open flames.
It depends on how realistic your survival school needs to be.
Alternatively, add some wild herb, wrap in foil to avoid drying the meat, cover with embers.
Dave

#7 bruno527

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 07:31 AM

Go for the stew, & cook well. bring to boil & slow cook, simmer , for longer.

Rabbit & all eadable animal is riddled in parasites..ALL meat nees to stand 24hrs , some where cool & bug free, before eating as a rule..but to survive cook well, from fresh. smile.gif

#8 John Hayward

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Posted 26 November 2009 - 02:38 PM

In all the pages I've seen, and all the forums I'm on, this is the first time I've ever been told to hang for 24 hrs as a matter of health. I will be following this though as it makes perfect sense to me.

Thank you for the top tip!!

As for the cooking, I shall go for boiling with wild herbs and veg, I think.

#9 hughgoldsmith

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Posted 27 November 2009 - 12:24 AM

QUOTE(bruno527 @ Thu Nov 26 2009, 07:31) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
ALL meat nees to stand 24hrs


I totally disagree with this!

Hugh


#10 dartmoor shooter

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 06:41 PM

If your students are issued with decent mess tins you can use a pair (big one upside down over the little one right way up) as a dutch oven, cover with embers and leave. This is also a good way of cooking a slow stew as light ally pans dont lend themselves to slow stewing.

#11 Gibbs

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 07:53 PM

I've never heard of hanging Rabbit on health grounds and in fact, I've heard many times NOT to hang Rabbit at all. The heat of cooking will kill all parasites.
I'm not a survivalist, but I'm very handy with a BBQ. I understand a wood fire doesn't produce the heat of charcoal. If the meat is likely to end up tough, then build a bigger fire and let it die down before you cook on it, and don't have the meat so close, so it cooks more gently and for longer. Basting would help, but that might not be possible. And always leave roast meat to rest after cooking.

#12 Bob Johnson

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 08:25 PM

I disagree too. Fresh rabbit, infact fresh anything always tasted better to me.

In a survival senario I would make a clay shell around the skinned rabbit and cook it in the embers or in hot rocks.

#13 Gibbs

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Posted 11 February 2010 - 08:37 PM

QUOTE(Bob Johnson @ Thu Feb 11 2010, 21:25) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I disagree too. Fresh rabbit, infact fresh anything always tasted better to me.

In a survival senario I would make a clay shell around the skinned rabbit and cook it in the embers or in hot rocks.


That's a good idea! And if your lucky you can dig up the clay and build the fire in the hole you made?

#14 Brian Again

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Posted 14 February 2010 - 10:14 PM

QUOTE(Gibbs @ Thu Feb 11 2010, 20:37) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
That's a good idea! And if your lucky you can dig up the clay and build the fire in the hole you made?


I'm not sure that I would even skin it, just remove the guts, roll it in a clay ball and cook it. The skin will probably come away with the clay.

#15 gerrybongo

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Posted 15 February 2010 - 12:47 AM

soak in good old coca cola for as long as poss it will tenderise the meat it breaks down the fibres an old cooking trick, then kebab it with a few wild mushrooms , onion also added pretty tasty and TENDER ,stew is by far the best as stated before but can still be tenderised and is the hanging a rabbit not getting confused with a HARE now you do hang those

Edited by gerrybongo, 15 February 2010 - 12:54 AM.


#16 Gonks

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Posted 01 March 2010 - 10:17 PM

Boil your rabbit slowly for about 2 hours, then add some young nettle leaves, wild garlic and a handful of wood sorrel.

It falls off the bone and has a lovely slight lemon flavour from the wood sorrel. When I used to run survival camps this always floated my students boats. Serve it with some soda bread and its a feast for a king.

Cheers

Gonks

Edited by Gonks, 01 March 2010 - 10:20 PM.


#17 The Green Man

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 09:34 AM

QUOTE(Gonks @ Mon Mar 1 2010, 22:17) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Boil your rabbit slowly for about 2 hours, then add some young nettle leaves, wild garlic and a handful of wood sorrel.

It falls off the bone and has a lovely slight lemon flavour from the wood sorrel. When I used to run survival camps this always floated my students boats. Serve it with some soda bread and its a feast for a king.

Cheers

Gonks


Dampers too awink.gif (or did you mean that?).


#18 Gonks

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 11:25 AM

Ah, Dampers! That takes me back to my Scouting days. Trying to wrap a lump of dough around a greenstick, whilst keeping it out of the leaf litter. Great times!!

Gonks

#19 The Green Man

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 05:10 PM

Dampers in a potjie (mix in a little squeezed orange juice and herbs, plenty of salt too) very nice. Twisties I had forgotten about, yep... memories of scouting days smile.gif

#20 darran77

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 01:53 PM

QUOTE(Brian Again @ Sun Feb 14 2010, 22:14) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I'm not sure that I would even skin it, just remove the guts, roll it in a clay ball and cook it. The skin will probably come away with the clay.

Isn't that what they do with hedgehog's .
daz

#21 Guest_Chriss200_*

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Posted 20 May 2010 - 08:26 AM

I like Brian again's post about the Dutch oven, went on a wild food course and stewed rabbit in one. It was fantastic! I purchased my own from the link below recently and haven't looked back! Got the skillet and griddle too!

http://www.ronniesun...ns-c-31_68.html

#22 Guest_TheRambler_*

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Posted 23 June 2010 - 06:35 AM

QUOTE(darran77 @ Thu Mar 4 2010, 14:53) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Isn't that what they do with hedgehog's .
daz


It is what the old gypsies did when cooking hedgehog. It was a way of removing the needles/spines from the animal once cooked.

A rabbit doesn't need hanging, if you have gutted and skinned it in the field then all traces of parasite are removed. Remove the head as some parasites reside in the brain! And also make sure you rinse in a stream or bottled water to remove any hair and pollutants. These are basic food laws. As for hanging, well thats just for Hares and other Game meats.

A nice way of cooking any meat on a fire or in embers is too stuff the cavity with any moist ingredients i.e Marmalade, cook-in-sauce's or even Baked Beans then wrap leaves round the meat to keep in the moisture and place in the embers of a recent fire.

Hope this helps

cool.gif

#23 christhefish

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Posted 22 July 2010 - 07:50 AM

Some great ideas here, what id also like to know is just how 'survival' you'll be going.

Will you be taking extra ingredients or will you be going 'au naturel?'

when ever ive been in the field for extended periods things like oxo cubes, s+p and bottle of tobasco always justify their space in the bergan but if your doing thing strictly survival then my advice is to find a wooded area with lots of natural food and go for it with whatever is in season (wild herbs, fungi and fruits etc).

personally it takes a lot to beat a slow casseroled rabbit in oxo stock thickened with flour and with root veg when out camping!

#24 Guest_bibs_*

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Posted 10 August 2010 - 10:16 AM

i saw a survival programme where they baked it in clay for 45 mins and it looked very juicy. just cover it in clay then put it in the cinders and cover. thumb.gif

Edited by bibs, 10 August 2010 - 10:16 AM.


#25 Gerald

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 02:59 AM

I have cooked rabbit in the wild by using the old metal pan and bowl that the old boyscouts use to use.
The method is the same as cooking a pig in a caja china.
Use the two pans by putting the rabbit in the lower pan and put the other upside down so that you create a pot like a dutch oven.
The move hot coals on the top and let it cook, keep adding hot coals if needed until its readly.
You can add a little water to help it steam to get tender.
add spices or herbs to you liking.
Make the rabbit come out very tender and good.

Just the way I tried a few time.


#26 steveh

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Posted 03 November 2015 - 12:56 PM

wrap gutted but unskinned rabbit in damp peat, moss etc leave on embers of your fire overnight or for a few hours at least, may need turning locationally, check it's cooked through and enjoy.


Edited by steveh, 03 November 2015 - 12:57 PM.





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