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Can you Eat Jackdaws?


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#1 slugger

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 05:05 PM

Hi All,

I have just been reading a thread in the 'Hunting' section of this site. The topic title was 'shot any parakeets yet?'

One of the most rescent entries was someone talking about eating Jackdaws.

I am just wondering if any of you have heard of this or tried it for yourselves?

I have heard of cooking Rook pie around the begining of May etc but never tried it.

I would like to know if anyone has had any experience with this.

Also it would be good to know if there is any airgun quarry other than Rabbit, Pigeon, Squirrel and the above mentioned that would be safe to eat?

Any knowledge or advise anyone could share would be appriciated?

Slugger

#2 Gibbs

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 07:46 PM

The Jackdaw muncher would be me biggrin.gif
They were relatively young birds and I only tried them because I don't like waste. I did expect it to be horrible.
I took the breasts off of them and gently fried them in olive oil, salt and pepper. They tasted like lambs liver!
I would happily try it again.

#3 Gibbs

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 08:00 PM

What is safe to eat and what isn't safe is a good question!
I went to tech college as a butchery student and I can promise you that mixy rabbit is "safe" to eat. It can't be sold as safe, but it is!!
There is an old wives tale that eating pigeon 7 days in a row will kill you!? I cannot find out where that comes from, but pigeon do collect toxins and pesticides from modern farming practices. (I love pigeon by the way)
I was warned by someone not to eat any carion as they are all carriers (of disease) But I'm not sure about that. I have eaten crow, jackdaw, squirrel, feral pigeon and mixy rabbit! I don't think there are many other airgun quarry left on the list? I have heard that even a fox won't eat starling?(Starling isn't on the quarry list anymore)

#4 kitkat1963

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Posted 18 February 2010 - 10:57 PM

I was always told NOT to eat Crow or Feral Pigeons, as Crows eat carrion and roadkill etc, and Ferals are just rats with wings..........Ferret food only for these two nasties!

#5 kent

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 09:38 AM

Well ferals are infested with Salmonella and also citicosis, treat them as Rats. Heard many say about eating them but when you look at thier roosts caked in old poo - no thanks! I handle them only with gloves or a bag and won't use them for dog traning though know of others who do. Have you seen what Jackdaws eat yep poop, again no thanks i will use these for dog work though and don't have hang ups about gloves etc.
A good survival situation rule is don't eat anything that lives in a dirty place or eats carion and waste. If it were absoloute life or death i suppose i should eat anything though including rats. I suppose if you boil anthing in water long enough it will become sterile?
Oh when your strapped up to a life support and doctors keep asking your wife if you have been near pigeons it brings it home to roost (pun intended) but serious point!

#6 Gibbs

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 03:35 PM

Well "feral" can mean more than one type of pigeon. Feral pigeons in the cities and on rubbish tips are not the same as the feral pigeons that I have eaten and live in Cornish cow sheds in the "sticks"
Also, I don't throw the whole carcass in a big pot!! I just take the breasts off, which must surely be safe/r?
And as for salmonela, 70% of chickens bought in the UK used to carry that, just cook it properly!!

Edited by Gibbs, 19 February 2010 - 03:57 PM.


#7 kent

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 08:39 PM

If you were not so far away you could have dozens of Barn shot ones a week off me, they might eat different but they still live in thier own poo on those beams mate. They make a fair fox and crow bait mind you awink.gif

#8 Brian Again

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 09:39 PM

QUOTE(kent @ Fri Feb 19 2010, 20:39) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If you were not so far away you could have dozens of Barn shot ones a week off me, they might eat different but they still live in thier own poo on those beams mate. They make a fair fox and crow bait mind you awink.gif



That's not just a manky feral pigeon, that's an M&S Barn Shot feral pigeon, Mmmmmmm......

biggrin.gif

#9 kent

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 10:19 PM

QUOTE(Brian Again @ Fri Feb 19 2010, 21:39) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
That's not just a manky feral pigeon, that's an M&S Barn Shot feral pigeon, Mmmmmmm......

biggrin.gif

Now thats quite funny!

#10 Gibbs

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 12:49 PM

QUOTE(kent @ Fri Feb 19 2010, 21:39) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If you were not so far away you could have dozens of Barn shot ones a week off me, they might eat different but they still live in thier own poo on those beams mate. They make a fair fox and crow bait mind you awink.gif


Thanks for the offer smile.gif
Cows are often covered in poo too, but none of it ends up on my steak!

#11 kent

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 08:51 AM

and the cows get washed off prior to killing at the slaughter house, thier poop does not contain the levels of nasties bird poo does and i have yet to see a cow nestle into a two year old pile of excreament for the night.
Eat them if you wish but the number one reason most want them killed in barns and cow sheds etc is health

#12 Gibbs

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 09:42 AM

I left school as a butchery student and worked for many years in butchery and slaughter so I am fully aware of the procedures, and they are the same procedures that most hunters use to prepare their catch.

I have also done quite a bit of pest control and have shot hundreds of feral pigeons who were causing health issues. Those health issues are with pigeon droppings and not actually the pigeons. (obviously you don't get one without the other!) If your workshop is covered in pigeon muck, that is an obvious and serious health risk. A clean and properly cooked feral pigeon breast is not.

#13 eddiej35

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Posted 25 February 2010 - 07:08 PM

QUOTE(kent @ Sun Feb 21 2010, 08:51) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
and the cows get washed off prior to killing at the slaughter house, thier poop does not contain the levels of nasties bird poo does and i have yet to see a cow nestle into a two year old pile of excreament for the night.
Eat them if you wish but the number one reason most want them killed in barns and cow sheds etc is health

i worked in a slaughter house for 10 years and beleive me,nothing is washed before killing.also once skinned it only gets a quick rinse and that is in the major slaughter houses.your local smaller slaughter houses wont wash nothing.

#14 bingo

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Posted 25 February 2010 - 08:31 PM

considering that they live on carion and road kill and other potentially hazardous waste i wouldnt .my local foxes turn their noses up when i leave them jackdaws to eat

#15 kent

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Posted 26 February 2010 - 12:12 PM

QUOTE(Gibbs @ Sun Feb 21 2010, 09:42) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I left school as a butchery student and worked for many years in butchery and slaughter so I am fully aware of the procedures, and they are the same procedures that most hunters use to prepare their catch.

I have also done quite a bit of pest control and have shot hundreds of feral pigeons who were causing health issues. Those health issues are with pigeon droppings and not actually the pigeons. (obviously you don't get one without the other!) If your workshop is covered in pigeon muck, that is an obvious and serious health risk. A clean and properly cooked feral pigeon breast is not.

Not actually true citicosis is a deadly serious desease and it carried within the featered area as a type of dust that can be inhaled i am lead to believe from the doctors that treated me in intensive care. I am a level two stalker and carry trained hunter status and operatate under "the trained hunter exeption" also in dealing game and venison. In a previous time i was an enginneer and worked some time on maintentance in a large slaughter house and saw exactly what went on first hand. The truth is Ferals are a health risk from more than thier droppings and carry far more than the big two "Salmonella and citicosis". if you wish to eat them fine get on with it but consider your advice might actually put another forum member or reader in real danger this is my real consern i do not mean to come across overly forcefull or agressive with this post

#16 Gibbs

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Posted 26 February 2010 - 12:44 PM

QUOTE(eddiej35 @ Thu Feb 25 2010, 20:08) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
i worked in a slaughter house for 10 years and beleive me,nothing is washed before killing.also once skinned it only gets a quick rinse and that is in the major slaughter houses.your local smaller slaughter houses wont wash nothing.


The reason they don't wash anything is because of the large amount of bacteria in water, as stated butchers won't wash any meat.

#17 Gibbs

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Posted 26 February 2010 - 12:54 PM

QUOTE(kent @ Fri Feb 26 2010, 13:12) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Not actually true citicosis is a deadly serious desease and it carried within the featered area as a type of dust that can be inhaled i am lead to believe from the doctors that treated me in intensive care. I am a level two stalker and carry trained hunter status and operatate under "the trained hunter exeption" also in dealing game and venison. In a previous time i was an enginneer and worked some time on maintentance in a large slaughter house and saw exactly what went on first hand. The truth is Ferals are a health risk from more than thier droppings and carry far more than the big two "Salmonella and citicosis". if you wish to eat them fine get on with it but consider your advice might actually put another forum member or reader in real danger this is my real consern i do not mean to come across overly forcefull or agressive with this post


Feathers are legally a foreign body in a meat production plant/butchers shop and should not have anything to do with the meat itself. I appreciate your information and it is worth bearing in mind when just removing the breasts from a fully feathered bird. But I would be very suprised if Citicosis or any other disease can live through the cooking process. Why don't wood pigeons also have it?
As far as poor advice is concerned, unless you or I are professionally trained in any given area we are all at risk of giving poor advice. Surely, this fact would stop anyone ever voicing their opinion ever again. I based my opinion on years of eating feral pigeons without as much as a sneeze. Does anyone know if my personal opinion is legally binding? Can I be sued for voicing an uneducated opinion on a public forum?
No disrespect to you, as said, I do appreciate your info.

Edited by Gibbs, 26 February 2010 - 01:10 PM.


#18 kent

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Posted 26 February 2010 - 01:42 PM

I am glad you take my comments in good heart Gibbs. As for being Sued you can be sued for just about anything just depends on if it is sucessful. Good luck with the pigeon eating. Woodies are not carriers Mainly Ferals and Parrots

#19 Gibbs

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Posted 26 February 2010 - 02:53 PM

QUOTE(kent @ Fri Feb 26 2010, 14:42) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I am glad you take my comments in good heart Gibbs. As for being Sued you can be sued for just about anything just depends on if it is sucessful. Good luck with the pigeon eating. Woodies are not carriers Mainly Ferals and Parrots


So I guess the Jackdaws are safer to handle and eat than feral pigeons? (I'm not planning to eat Parrot)
I will just add that I reject about 1/4 of the ferals that I have shot as they are don't all look healthy enough to eat!

#20 Brooky

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Posted 24 March 2010 - 08:55 PM

Put it this way, stomach acid in birds and animals kills nearly everything, so the meat is disease free. Cattle, sheep, pigs, chickens, geese and ducks all eat slugs and snails, although cattle, sheep and pigs eat these by default as they are in the grass anyway. Alan Wicker once told Michael Palin 'eat anything as long as it's piping hot'.

#21 Mick G

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 09:15 AM

Can anyone remember the bloke who set out to try eating almost any animal? Years ago now. I remember he found badger and fox pretty awful and couldn't bring himself to eat a rat!



#22 mad mike

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 10:32 AM

That sounds like Len from our club...we have sarnies every week & he always says he's already eaten before he came out but....gulp gulp gulp   half a tray gone... :Barfly:...rumour has it that's really how Roy lost his thumb...he wasn't paying attention & Len gnawed it off thinking it was gristle on a beef sarnie...it wasn't till Roy started "yelping" anyone noticed... :rofl2:


Edited by mad mike, 13 October 2013 - 10:40 AM.


#23 Bamboozler

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 11:00 AM

My boss once ate a rat. We used have a big old wood burning incinerator kept ticking over throughout the winter on the farm Inevitably dead rats from traps would be tossed in it. Purely to amuse himself in the company of squeamish blokes from industrial units, he picked out a slightly charred rat and proceeded to nibble the meat from a hind leg.

He's still alive

#24 shinny

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 11:36 AM

Actually, you can EAT anything, it's just that some things are not very nice and some things can kill you!

#25 mad mike

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 06:38 PM

Just don't leave your fingers resting on a sarnie at our club when Len is in "feeding mode"...munch..good night...told ya.!



#26 DUNKS

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 03:07 PM

Just don't leave your fingers resting on a sarnie at our club when Len is in "feeding mode"...munch..good night...told ya.!

 

Bet you're glad he isn't on this forum! But of course I shall tell him, so watch your fingers. :lol2:



#27 mad mike

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 04:37 PM

Wondered when you would get around to this thread Pete...te hee..!



#28 SuffolkRifle

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 07:22 PM

My boss once ate a rat. We used have a big old wood burning incinerator kept ticking over throughout the winter on the farm Inevitably dead rats from traps would be tossed in it. Purely to amuse himself in the company of squeamish blokes from industrial units, he picked out a slightly charred rat and proceeded to nibble the meat from a hind leg.

He's still alive

Apparently, during the siege of Colchester during the Civil war, the inhabitants of the town ate rats & survived :awink:



#29 DaveL

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 08:45 PM

I guess that if you eat what the Chinese eat, you'd be OK.  Apparently, they will eat anything that grows or moves.

 

You may know that chickens' feet are presently a great delicacy to the Chinese and the reason for my dogs' piggies ear treats increasing so much in price is because the Chinese have taken a fancy to them, too.  Basically, ifeet and ears are just cartilege and fat, but if you have a sack of 'em, you might be able to flog 'em for a good sum in Peking LOL!

 

DaveL



#30 shinny

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 11:45 AM

Chicken Nuggetts are 100% chicken......it's all ground-up beaks, feet and ar*eholes!




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